“Possible Cyprus solution if EU member state conditions met” 

“Possible Cyprus solution if EU member state conditions met” 

Nicosia, December 30, 2015/Independent Balkan News Agency

By Kyriacos Kyriacou

It will be possible to reach a positive outcome as long as the solution meets the current conditions of a member state of the EU, said the Government Spokesman.

Nicos Christodoulides also noted that the solution must fully respect fundamental freedoms and human rights, and will also guarantee the independence and sovereignty of the under transformation state, Government Spokesman Nicos Christodoulides has said.

In a written statement commenting on remarks by Turkish Cypriot leader Mustafa Akinci during a televised interview on Tuesday evening, Christodoulides says that “we have repeatedly noted that in the ongoing process mutual understanding has been achieved on a number of issues, while at the same time there is disagreement on a number of other issues”.

“Yesterday’s statements by Akinci, expressing the positions of the Turkish Cypriot side, reaffirm this position of ours and justify our repeated statement that there is still much work to be done,” Christodoulides says.

He adds that “it will be possible, through the effort being made at the negotiating table, to reach a positive outcome as long as it is a solution which meets the current conditions of a member state of the EU and which will fully respect fundamental freedoms and human rights, and will also guarantee the independence and sovereignty of the under transformation state”.

“In the case of insistence on issues which do not guarantee the aforementioned, as well as the necessity for the solution to be functional and viable, we will not reach the desired results,” he points out.

He also said “our side remains serious and focused on the need for hard work and tough negotiations, in order to create the conditions which will allow us to be optimistic about a positive result, which not only will not leave winners and losers, but will secure the future of Cyprus as a modern European state”.

Cyprus, which joined the EU in 2004, has been divided since 1974, when Turkey invaded and occupied its northern third.