IBNA Op-Ed/Normalization is imperative

IBNA Op-Ed/Normalization is imperative

“There are certain fields that are diabolically difficult to return to normality, therefore we need a long period of decontamination of social life in all domains, above all in culture and education. With this, I imply the deletion of all falsities installed by the current government during these 9 years in culture, books, museums, monuments, media…”

By Kire Naumov*/Independent Balkan News Agency

While the current power machine is getting stuck every day on its own mud, people ask: what comes after this? What will happen after this?

A large number of “pragmatists” have said for years that after such governing, it’s insane to try and normalize this state.

I have often written and talked as to how difficult is the economic recovery of the state. I will continue to do this.

But now, I also want to talk about other fields, that are diabolically difficult to return to normality, therefore we need a long period of decontamination of social life in all domains, above all in culture and education. With this, I imply the deletion of all falsities installed by the current government during these 9 years in culture, books, museums, monuments, media…

Moreover, we must go back to the pro-European and pro Western idea for the future of this society, by avoiding the circus that comes out of the regime’s media, which talk in the name of the government.

This resembles to all those paid voices who swear on the East, Putin or Erdogan. It’s not that with this, they express their love to the Turkish or Russian people, but on the contrary, they are amazed by Putin for his lack of democracy, about the fact that he’s considered as a Tsar or the way he rules eternally.

They’re amazed by Erdogan, about the fact that overnight, he imprisons hundreds of journalists, political opponents, opposition activists and after all these, he tells the EU ‘to mind its own business’.

By supporting them and by attacking the West and its values, there’s a diabolical concealment of the absence of democracy in this country and nothing else. This is the desired recipe of PM Nikola Gruevski. Alongside this, we must also commit in the Euro Atlantic aspect. For this, we must see the nations that are successful today. A few centuries ago, while taking difficult decisions, these nations have gone by the motto: “Let us make the most of what we can make and lose the least of what we’re forced to lose”.

And of course, at the end, perhaps the most difficult one. Nevertheless, it’s clear that the current Albanian leaders have no desire for the progress and prosperity of their ethnic group (let alone the state). Instead of them, this must be done by the next government. Such anti-Albanian rhetoric made by those who are paid by the government, has not existed even before the 2001 conflict.

Some forgotten stereotypes are today provoking models of the propaganda of the regime to ruin the image of Albanians, by considering it as a non-emancipated tribe, fascists or frontists, along with other insults. This spirit has been created 13 years after the conflict or during the 11 years of the leadership of the head of the Albanian party BDI (Democratic Union for Integration), Ali Ahmeti. This spirit mounts frustration among Albanians and at the same time, it increases Macedonian antagonism.

Ali Ahmeti, as joint participant in the current regime, has lost the historical chance of taking Albanians of Macedonia to NATO and EU before his fellow patriots in Albania and Kosovo. He will be blamed for never making Albanians of Macedonia citizens of the EU.

If Ali Ahmeti doesn’t care about this and if he has other plans, then, the next government must change this, with our without Albanian leaders.

Through politics that will enable European prosperity and reduction of poverty amid Albanians and Macedonians, without the devious games of the elites that are happy that some suffer more than the others, our country can sail on the quiet waters of European civilization.

If the next government is able to meet these objectives, it will immediately be seen if the locomotive has gone back on track. Of course, this is not enough, because at the moment, the entire train has left the tracks and is on the wrong tracks.

*The author is expert of security affairs. Former head of the Agency for Counter Intelligence and member of the steering committee of the largest opposition party, LSDM

** The opinion of the author doesn’t necessarily represent IBNA’s editorial line