IBNA Op-Ed/How can the political crisis in Kosovo be solved

IBNA Op-Ed/How can the political crisis in Kosovo be solved

The lack of political agreement easily enables Kosovo to be governed again by UNMIK as of June!

By Seremb Gjergji

The actions of all political parties are isolating Kosovo. Ambassador Delawie was clear: “We’re failing”.

In these circumstances, it’s up to our institutions to seriously handle the problems that we have and define the priorities. We can achieve anything if we put aside our personal interests and grudges, by letting the national interest prevail.

There are a number of steps which must be taken in order to reach the necessary agreement in the best interest of the country and the people. A number of points which would improve the life of the citizens and the state.

Success is only achieved if there’s a rational debate!

The failure to approve this proposa can easily leave the country without a president, parliament and a government.

There’s not much time left, but these are the steps and the agreements that must be reached:

  1. Starting from Independence Day on 17 February, 9 to 12 months must be spent for the preparation of the new elections. The electoral code must be changed and there must be amendments in the law for the funding of political parties and procedures for the prevention of the theft of votes.
  2. Presidential elections must be held in September and all necessary constitutional and legal amendments must be done until the end of July. This gives time to the candidates to prepare in line of the new law for the election of the new President.
  3. Parliament appoints a special committee led by the opposition to monitor the drafting of the Bylaws of the Association of Multiethnic Association (not Serb Communes). They must be called Multiethnic Communes and not Serb Communes – it is the remark of the Constitutional Court because from a Multiethnicity, the current agreement turns Kosovo into a Serb Monothnicity.
    • The opposition must lead the entire process of the drafting of the Bylaws of the Association of Multi Ethnic Communes.
  4. The president’s office decrees the Committee for Demarcation led by the opposition.
  5. In all future talks with Serbia, one participant of the opposition will be part of the government, until the new government is formed.
  6. The agreement is signed on 17 February 2016 and is approved in the Parliament of Kosovo in a solemn session. Thus, the independence celebrations turn into a great day for us.

But we must be careful, the lack of political agreement easily enables Kosovo to be governed again by UNMIK as of June and the country can go back to 1999. Do we really want this?!

*Sent by the author, publicist in Kosovo

** The opinion of the author doesn’t necessarily represent IBNA’s editorial line