EC calls on Croatia to improve the protection against pollution legal framework

EC calls on Croatia to improve the protection against pollution legal framework

The European Commission is asking Croatia to correctly enact into national law the EU rules on integrated prevention and control of pollution arising from industrial activities. The Industrial Emissions Directive (Directive 2010/75/EU) lays down rules which include the prevention or reduction of emissions into the air, water and soil and the prevention of waste generation.

“Croatia has not correctly transposed some articles of the Directive. Among those, definitions of ‘installation’, ‘best available techniques’ or ‘baseline condition’ are wrongly transposed. In addition, special requirements on the frequency of site visits, timeliness of inspection, and a clear obligation for the inspection report to describe the relevant findings, are missing from the national legislation”.

“Therefore, the Commission is sending a letter of formal notice to Croatia. The Member State has three months to address the shortcomings identified by the Commission. In the absence of a satisfactory response, the Commission may decide to send a reasoned opinion”, stresses the EC in a statement.

The Commission also said it has sent two more formal notices to Croatia – for infringing EU law on consumers’ and travellers’ rights, and for incorrectly applying EU rules relating to the protection of the euro and other currencies against counterfeiting.

“The Commission has decided to send letters of formal notice to Croatia, Luxembourg, Malta, Slovakia and Slovenia for incorrectly applying EU rules relating to the protection of the euro and other currencies against counterfeiting. These rules, laid down in Directive 2014/62/EU, are essential for reinforcing the EU framework for fighting against counterfeit notes and coins … Croatia has not correctly transposed the Directive’s provisions related to the criminalisation of the use of legal means or facilities for manufacturing counterfeit currency, and cases of banknotes and coins that are not yet issued but are designated for circulation as legal tender. This means that the national transposing legislation has not been sufficiently clear in criminalising the use of facilities or materials contrary to the rights or the conditions under which the competent authorities may use them to issue notes or coins”, the announcement reads.

Croatia has also received three reasoned opinions for its failure to fully transpose the EU rules reinforcing the sustainability of biofuels; for the failure to comply with the EU Third Energy Package, and for failure to comply with the EU rules for energy efficiency./ibna