Basescu: 2009 referendum should be starting point of amending the Constitution

Basescu: 2009 referendum should be starting point of amending the Constitution

The President claims he kept his term in office throughout the years thanks to the Constitution and told the parliamentary majority consisting of USL that “no majority is above the law.”

President Traian Basescu stated yesterday, in a debate organized at the Romanian Academy on the issue of amending the Constitution, that the starting point of modifying the Constitution should be the 2009 referendum on a unicameral Parliament with 300 MPs, underlining that any other option would place those implementing it “above the people’s will.” “Nobody can ignore Article 1 of the Romanian Constitution which very clearly points out that sovereignty belongs to the people, is directly expressed through elected representatives or through referendum,” Basescu stated, being quoted by Mediafax. The President stated he is bothered by the fact that although there is currently a parliamentary commission and a civil society commission for the process of amending the Constitution, their goals are not known. “My surprise is that everyone announces the amending of the Constitution but nobody announces its goals. All of those who announced they are skilled in the Constitution talked about anything but applying the will of the sovereign people,” the President underlined. The Head of State pointed out that the process of amending the Constitution was started in 2010 by the government led by Emil Boc and backed by the Presidency, pointing out that “well over two years have passed since Parliament basically avoided this project.” In fact, he declared himself surprised by the Romanian Academy’s initiative to initiate and host yesterday’s debate, given the fact that it did not come up with a similar initiative three years ago. On the other hand, Basescu pointed out that the draft Constitutional amendment initiated in 2010 also sought to replace the secret vote procedure at the Superior Magistracy Council (CSM) with an open vote procedure and to remove the Head of State’s prerogative of chairing the Council’s meetings. He pointed out that the decision to replace the secret vote procedure at the CSM was thought out to ensure a better “control” of the Council’s activities through transparency, the televised broadcasting of the Council’s works not being enough in this sense.